McCallroots family history
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1  Buckminster, Elizabeth (I7482)
 
2  Source (S531)
 
3  Source (S1130)
 
4 G BRIERLY
Birth Date: 7 Aug 1915
Death Date: 20 Aug 2003
Social Security Number: 017-10-7234
State or Territory Where Number Was Issued: Massachusetts

Death Residence Localities
ZIP Code: 07054
Localities: Parsippany, Morris, New Jersey
Parsippany Troy Hills, Morris, New Jersey
Troy Hills, Morris, New Jersey
 
Brierly, Gordon Frederick (I4273)
 
5

 
Bemis, John (I5080)
 
6

Betsy Campbell married Argyle Campbell circa 1812 and they had four sons, the last being born in 1820.. 

Argyle's departure in 1820 could well have been the act of a "vanishing husband" which has been described as the common practice to get a divorce in the absence of other options.  Her father's (Joseph Jacox) 1852 will identifies Betsy as the "widow of Argyle Campbell late of Chesterfield". 

Following Argyle's leaving, Betsy (based on US Federal Census analysis) was in 1820 (as of August 7, 1820 which was the Enumeration for that census) living with her father and mother with her four sons in Chesterfield (Argyle did not fit in the profile). Betsy can not be accounted for in 1830 U. S. Federal Census and nor is it known how and when Charles got to Belpre, Ohio.  The following speculation is the result of theoretical analysis of and around facts that are known.
  Nothing was heard from Argyle after he left Chesterfield in mid-1820.  Betsy wanted to find him and took her youngest son, Charles, in tow and set off to find him or seek some knowledge of his whereabouts.  Her older sister, Mary, and family had left Chesterfield, New York, after 1810 and were settled in Danby, New York, about 250 miles distance.  Betsy and Charles went to her sister's home in Danby, New York, with the hope that the possible previous relationship of Argyle with Mary's family circa 1810, might provide some answers.  According to the New York State census for 1825 Danby, New York the family profile could account for Mary's family including Betsy and Charles except for the oldest son Theodore.  He probably was just married (he had a daughter in 1826 born in New York state) and living elsewhere.  The U. S. Census for 1830 does not provide much help.  Mary and William Wilder and their daughter Betsy were in Springfield, Pennsylvania.  Their son Renselaer died in 1830 and was buried in Springfield.  Their son Theodore could have been practicing his medicine somewhere close to Danby, New York and his wife Betsey E. and daughter Caroline were with him.  He does not appear as a head of household in New York in 1830 and may have been living with his wife's family.  It is possible that Charles was there too.  Apparently a deep bonding developed between Charles and Theodore before he moved on to Ohio where he married and settled in Belpre by 1842.  Theodore may have become a surrogate father to Charles (a first cousin fifteen years younger) and after whom Charles later named his first born son, Theodore Wilder Campbell. 
 
How long Betsy was away from Chesterfield is not known.  She can be accounted for in Danby in 1825.  She is not found in the 1830 U. S.Federal Census.  Her mother Phebe died in 1832 so she may have been home by that time.  In 1840 she can be accounted for again on the census.  This journey for Charles may in retrospect be the most logical means for him make his way eventually to Ohio.

Based on US Federal Census analysis for 1840 she probably was with father and sons  Joseph and John in Chesterfield; 1850 with sons Joseph and John and her father in Chesterfield; 1860 with son Joseph in Chesterfield; 1870 with son Alexander in Westport, New York.  The New York State Census of 1865 shows her living with her nephew George W. Fowler, Jr.  
Jacox, Betsy (I8493)
 
7

Betsy Campbell married Argyle Campbell circa 1812 and they had four sons, the last being born in 1820.. 

Argyle's departure in 1820 could well have been the act of a "vanishing husband" which has been described as the common practice to get a divorce in the absence of other options.  Her father's (Joseph Jacox) 1852 will identifies Betsy as the "widow of Argyle Campbell late of Chesterfield". 

Following Argyle's leaving, Betsy (based on US Federal Census analysis) was in 1820 (as of August 7, 1820 which was the Enumeration for that census) living with her father and mother with her four sons in Chesterfield (Argyle did not fit in the profile). Betsy can not be accounted for in 1830 U. S. Federal Census and nor is it known how and when Charles got to Belpre, Ohio.  The following speculation is the result of theoretical analysis of and around facts that are known.
  Nothing was heard from Argyle after he left Chesterfield in mid-1820.  Betsy wanted to find him and took her youngest son, Charles, in tow and set off to find him or seek some knowledge of his whereabouts.  Her older sister, Mary, and family had left Chesterfield, New York, after 1810 and were settled in Danby, New York, about 250 miles distance.  Betsy and Charles went to her sister's home in Danby, New York, with the hope that the possible previous relationship of Argyle with Mary's family circa 1810, might provide some answers.  According to the New York State census for 1825 Danby, New York the family profile could account for Mary's family including Betsy and Charles except for the oldest son Theodore.  He probably was just married (he had a daughter in 1826 born in New York state) and living elsewhere.  The U. S. Census for 1830 does not provide much help.  Mary and William Wilder and their daughter Betsy were in Springfield, Pennsylvania.  Their son Renselaer died in 1830 and was buried in Springfield.  Their son Theodore could have been practicing his medicine somewhere close to Danby, New York and his wife Betsey E. and daughter Caroline were with him.  He does not appear as a head of household in New York in 1830 and may have been living with his wife's family.  It is possible that Charles was there too.  Apparently a deep bonding developed between Charles and Theodore before he moved on to Ohio where he married and settled in Belpre by 1842.  Theodore may have become a surrogate father to Charles (a first cousin fifteen years younger) and after whom Charles later named his first born son, Theodore Wilder Campbell. 
 
How long Betsy was away from Chesterfield is not known.  She can be accounted for in Danby in 1825.  She is not found in the 1830 U. S.Federal Census.  Her mother Phebe died in 1832 so she may have been home by that time.  In 1840 she can be accounted for again on the census.  This journey for Charles may in retrospect be the most logical means for him make his way eventually to Ohio.

Based on US Federal Census analysis for 1840 she probably was with father and sons  Joseph and John in Chesterfield; 1850 with sons Joseph and John and her father in Chesterfield; 1860 with son Joseph in Chesterfield; 1870 with son Alexander in Westport, New York.  The New York State Census of 1865 shows her living with her nephew George W. Fowler, Jr.  
Jacus, Elizabeth (I94)
 
8

The surname has many spellings, Jacus, Jacox, Jaycox, Jecocks, Jicock, and others. Jacus is on Joseph's and Phebe's grave markers.

Chatham and Hudson Monthly Meeting, Columbia County, New York, Quaker Records show entries in 1794, 1795 and 1796 for Joseph and Phebe indicating that they were Quakers.  

 In 1800 Joseph and Phebe Jacox were settled in Peru (in a part of which is now Chesterfield).  Where the family originally came from is still unknown.  They were in Duchess County, New York, in 1789 when Betsy was born.  They were in Granville, Vermont, at the time of the 1790 US Federal Census was taken.  They were in Peru, Clinton County, New York, at the time of the 1800 US Federal Census. (Analysis of that census indicates that both Betsy Jacox and Argyle Campbell possibly were in Peru at that time.)  Joseph Jacox bought land in November 1801 in what is now Chesterfield. [Jurisdictional lines changed from Peru, Clinton County in 1799 to Willsboro, Essex County and on 20 February 1802 became Chesterfield, Essex County.] Research indicates the land to be on one of the earliest roads around Keeseville.  Also a log house was built on the land.  All succeeding U.S. Federal Censuses 1810 through 1850 show Joseph living in Chesterfield.

From the Public Laws of the State of New York, 31st Session, Chap CL, "An Act Authorizing the Raising of Money to Build a Bridge Over the Great River Sable," passed 6 April 1808, p. 327-328, in part "III. And be it further enacted, That Richard Keese, Robert Batty and Joseph Jecocks, be and they are hereby appointed commissioners, for the purpose of superintending the building of the aforesaid bridge, at such place within the limits directed in this act, as they or a majority shall think proper; and the said commissioners or a majority of them may contract with workmen and purchase materials for erecting said bridge ; .........."

Joseph birth and death dates are by analysis as follows. Joseph died on May 25, 1852 (based on probate papers on file with his will written in 1852) although the year 1853 is on the gravestone and shows an attained age of 99y 5m. In his will signed April 6, 1852 he declared his age as 98 years. On 1850 U. S. Federal Census enumerated on September 16, 1850 shows his age as 96. Therefore he would have been 97 in December of 1850 and 98 in December of 1851 which is in agreement with his will. He therefore would have been 98y 5m at his death. His date of birth then would be December 25, 1753. 
Jacus, Joseph (I3208)
 
9

William Wilder was a medical doctor.

William Wilder and family were in Chesterfield, New York at the time of the 1810 U. S. Federal Census. They were in Danby, Tompkins County, New York, according to the 1820 U. S. Federal Census and 1825 New York State Census.  In 1830 William, Mary and daughter Betsy were in Springfield, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. Son Theodore who also was a medical doctor and presumably practicing medicine nearby in New York at that time.

Based on the foregoing 1810 census Wilder family profile, it is possible for Argyle Campbell to be a part of it. 
Wilder, William (I8564)
 
10

Data from United States Federal Census Records
1850 - was a member of Thomas McFarland (maternal grandfather?) household in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio, age 2
1860 - status the same, age 12
1870 - status the same, age 22

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

US Federal Census data:
1850
Member Thomas McFarland (maternal grandfather?) household in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio, age 2
1860
Status the same, age 12
1870
Status the same, age 22

-- MERGED NOTE ------------


Data from United States Federal Census Records
1850 - was a member of Thomas McFarland (maternal grandfather?) household in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio, age 2
1860 - status the same, age 12
1870 - status the same, age 22 
Simpson, Rebecca Jane (I8507)
 
11

Data from United States Federal Census Records
1860 - was living in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio, with his parents
1870 - as above
1880 - was living in Union, Adams County, Iowa with wife Ida and children John, age 4 and Theodore, age 10 months.
1900 - was living in Sumner, Pierce County, Washington with wife Ida and Theodore O., age 20 and Nellie B., age 16; occupation farmer.
1910 - was living in Roy, Pierce County, Washington with wife Ida and no children at home.
1920 - was living in Chemawa, Marion County, Oregon with wife Ida and no children at home; occupation farmer.
1930 - shows Ida as head of household living in Los Angeles, California and listed as widowed. 
Campbell, Charles Henry (I6260)
 
12

Data from United States Federal Census Records
1930 - living in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan as head of household with wife, Christine G., and child Ellis A. age 2 1/2; occupation machine shop manager 
May, Edward Moore (I8514)
 
13

Data from United States Federal Census Records
1930 - was living in Oak Park, Cook County. Illinois with her brother Harold and mother Alice; occupation music teacher.
1940 - was living in Oak Park, Cook County. Illinois with her brother Harold and mother Alice; occupation public school teacher. 
Campbell, Sara(h?) Irene (I8511)
 
14

U. S. Federal Census Data
1830 - living alone in Springfield, Pennsylvania
1840 - profile suggests living with a wife and three children in Springfield, Pennsylvania 
Newell, Jacob (I8565)
 
15

A sad timeline emerges for the first ten years of the married life of Elizabeth Jane Campbell. She and husband John had five children, Ann born 1852, Charles born 1853, Harriet born about 1856, John Jr. born about 1858 and Jane born in 1860. John Jr. died after 11 months of scrofula illness in 1859, husband John died in 1860 after five years of consumption, and Charles died in 1871.

On the New York Census for 1865 Elixabeth Jane, now known as Eliza, shows as an employee for James W. Taggard in Chesterfield, New York, and living in his boarding house with daughters Ann and Hattie. In 1870 the U. S. Federal Census shows her as a domestic servant in a boarding house in Manchester, New Hampshire and daughter Hattie living with her. There is no record of Ann's whereabouts. In 1880 the Federal Census shows Eliza living in Bedford, New Hampshire, with husband James F. Heselton, daughter Hattie and grandson John D. Campbell. 
Lennox, Elizabeth Jane (I8581)
 
16

Alva's death certificate shows that he was a retired superintendent of schools. 
Hopper, Alva D. (I8515)
 
17

Annual Meeting minutes from the Troy Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church (Vermont and New York) Spring, 1883

XVI. - MEMOIRS
______
1. ALEXANDER CAMPBELL.

Alexander Campbell was born in the town of Chesterfield, Essex Co., N. Y., September 28, 1816, and died at North Granville, May 8, 1882.

From early childhood he appeared religiously inclined, and was very conscientious. At the age of sixteen he was converted to God under the labors of Rev. Merritt Bates, then pastor of the church at Keeseville. He immediately united with the society in that place, and continued a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church until called to the Church triumphant. Having received an assurance of his acceptance with God, he at once commenced laboring for the salvation of his friends. God crowned his labors, and he soon became satisfied that he was divinely called to the work of the ministry. His early educational advantages had been confined to the common schools of his native town. To prepare himself for the great work to which he felt clear that God had called him, he repaired to Troy Conference Academy, where he spent several terms. In due time he was licensed to preach, and recommended to Conference. He was admitted on trial at the session of Troy Conference of 1839, and appointed to Weybridge Circuit, Vt. His subsequent appointments were as follows:

1840, Essex, Vt.; 1841, Milton; 1842-43, Hinesburg; 1844, Stowe; 1845, Morristown; 1846, Saranac, N. Y.; 1847, Dorset and Manchester, Vt.; 1848-49, Arlington; 1850-51, Salem; 1852-53, Easton and Cambridge; 1854-55, Rutland, Vt.; 1 856-57, Rensselaerville; 1858-59, Knox; 1860-61, Shelburne, Vt.; 1862-63, Franklin; 1864-65, Rutland, (second time) 1866-68, Tomhannock, N. Y.; 1869-70, Westport; 1871-7a, Agent of Freedmen's Aid Society; 1874-76, Sandford's Ridge; 1877-79, Bridgeport and Shoreham; 1880, Hampton; 1881-82, North Granville. He received forty-three appointments from the Bishops, and filled forty-two of them in the same number of consecutive years. He was present at the last session of our Conference, apparently in usual health. Near the close he took a severe cold, and returned home quite unwell. His cold soon settled into pneumonia, from which he suffered until May 8, when he expired. He performed no ministerial service on his charge after his return from Conference.

He died suddenly, leaving behind him the record of a devoted life.

Brother Campbell was a diligent student. He never learned as easily as some, but he made up this lack by close application. He was a very acceptable preacher, his voice and manner were very pleasant and attractive, and his sermons showed thought and careful study. As a pastor, he was faithful, genial, and kind. He was true to the solemn pledge he made, when admitted a member of the Conference, “to visit from house to house.” He performed this part of his work conscientiously. He went among the people to do them good. He attended faithfully to all the duties of a Methodist preacher. He was generally beloved by all classes where he labored, and admired for his diligence and fidelity. God honored his labors with extensive revivals in many instances.

Our departed brother was eminently a man of God. Few among us fast and pray as much as did Alexander Campbell. He was serious. His motto was, “Holiness to the Lord.” It was said of him, by all classes, as they beheld his life, and listened to his conversation, “He is a good man.” A conscientious, devoted, earnest Christian minister was taken from us when God called him away. Brother Campbell was twice married. His first wife, and the mother of all his children, died some years since, leaving behind an unblemished Christian reputation. His second wife, a most estimable Christian lady, one daughter, and several sons, survive to mourn their loss. Our brother was peculiarly happy in his domestic relations. Heaven bless the surviving ones, and, when with them the turmoils of life are over, give the family a happy reunion among the eternally saved!






-- MERGED NOTE ------------



Troy Conference Methodist Annual Meeting Minutes - Spring 1883 - pages 67-68

XVI - MEMOIRS

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL

Alexander Campbell was born in the town of Chesterfield, Essex Co., N. Y., September 28, 1816, and died at North Granville, May 8, 1882.

From early childhood he appeared religiously inclined, and was very conscientious. At the age of sixteen he was converted to God under the labors of Rev. Merritt Bates, then pastor of the church at Keesville. He immediately united with the society in that place, and continued a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church until the Church triumphant. Having received an assurance of his acceptance with God, he at once commenced laboring for the salvation his friends. God crowned his labors, and he soon became satisfied that he was divinely called to the work of the ministry. His early educational advantages had been confined to the common schools of his native town. To prepare himself for the great work to which he felt clear that God had called him, he repaired to Troy Conference Academy, where he spent several terms. In due time he was licensed to preach, and recommended to Conference. He was admitted on trial at the session of Troy Conference of 1839, and appointed to Weybridge Circuit, Vt. His subsequent appointments were as follows: 1840, Essex, Vt.; 1841, Milton; 1842-43, Hinesburg; 1844, Stowe; 1845, Morristown; 1846, Saranac, N. Y.; 1847, Dorset and Manchester, Vt.; 1848-49, Arlington; 1850-51, Salem; 1852-53, Easton and Cambridge; 1854-55, Rutland, Vt.; 1856-57, Rensselaerville; 1858-59, Knox; 1860-61, Shelburne, Vt.; 1862-63, Franklin; 1864-65, Rutland, (second time); 1866-68, Tomhannock, N. Y.; 1869-70, Westport; 1871-73, Agent of Freedmen's Aid Society; 1874-76, Sanford's Ridge; 1877-79, Bridgeport and Shoreham; 1880, Hampton; 1881-82, North Granville. He received forty-three appointments from the Bishops, and filled forty-two of them in the same number of consecutive years. He was present at the last session of our Conference, apparently in usual health. Near the close he took a severe cold, and returned home quite unwell. His cold soon settled into pneumonia, from which he suffered until May 8, when he expired. He performed no ministerial services on his charge after his return from Conference. He died suddenly, leaving behind him the record of a devoted life.

Brother Campbell was a diligent student. He never learned as easily as some, but he made up this lack by close application. He was a very acceptable preacher, his voice and manner were very pleasant and attractive, and his sermons showed thought and careful study. As a pastor, he was faithful, genial, and kind. He was true to the solemn pledge he made, when admitted a member of the Conference, "to visit from house to house". He performed this part of his work conscientiously. He went among the people to do them good. He attended faithfully to all the duties of a Methodist preacher. He was generally loved by all classes where he labored, and admired for his diligence and fidelity. God honored his labors with extensive revivals in many instances.

Our departed brother was eminently a man of God. Few among us fast and pray as much as Alexander Campbell. He was serious. His motto was "Holiness to the Lord". It was said of him, by all classes, as they beheld his life, and listened to his conversation, "He is a good man". A conscientious, devoted, earnest Christian minister was taken from us when God called him away.

Brother Campbell was twice married. His first wife, and the mother of all his children, died some years since, leaving behind an unblemished Christian reputation. His second wife, a most estimable Christian lady, one daughter, and several sons, survive to mourn their loss. Our brother was peculiarly happy in his domestic relations. Heaven bless the surviving ones, and, when the turmoils of life are over, give this family a happy reunion among the eternally saved!

End of memoir.

Alexander Campbell received his license to exhort April 4, 1837 and license to preach July 23, 1836. On June 5, 1842 he became a Deacon in the Methodist Episcopal Church and could administer the Ordinance of Baptism, Marriage, and the Burial of the Dead, in the Absence of an Elder. On June 23, 1844 he became an Elder of the church.

Alexander Campbell was the founder of first Methodist Church in Rutland, Vermont. 
Campbell, Rev. Alexander (I83)
 
18

Elizabeth's birth date was calculed based on her age at death as 32y 1m. 
Campbell, Elizabeth (I8127)
 
19

Franklin's date of death was transcribed as "5 Mar 18_4". It could be either 1854 or 1864. His life span was 7m, 22d. Maybe the latter as a tradition of using the name of a young decedent for the next child of the same sex as in the case of Sarah T. and Sarah (Luna). 
Campbell, Franklin (I8557)
 
20

From the obituary printed in the Kansas City Star, July 30, 1933
"Dr. Campbell was one of the pioneer dentists of Kansas City. He was born August 19, 1858, and was graduated from the Ohio College of Dental Surgery at Cincinnati in 1885. For many years he taught in the Kansas City Dental college and his lectures are recalled by many practicing dentists in the middle West. He was a charter member of the Kansas City Dental Society."
There were 6 active pallbearers listed and 20 honorary pallbearers listed. In addition the entire membership of the Kansas City Dental Society were honorary pallbearers. 
Campbell, William L. (I8550)
 
21

On the 1900 U. S. Federal Census Albert M. Badger is shown living with his aunt Jennie C. Willard nee Jane Campbell in Middlebury, Vermont. Sometime after the 1900 census was taken Albert must have been adopted as Albert M. Badger's birth record shows him as Albert Willard born March 26, 1895 in Nashua, New Hampshire, father as Frank E. Willard and mother as Jane Campbell.  Subsequent records show his full name to be Albert Manley Willard. 
Badger, Albert Manley (I8592)
 
22

There were no known children resulting from the marriage of Arthur Campbell and Eugenia Hoyt. However, Eugenia had at least two children from her previous marriage to Jesse Lee Porter, one of whom was a daughter named Martha H. Porter born in Missouri October 5, 1907 and died March 13, 1973 in Longview, Cowlitz County, Washington. In Seattle, King County, Washington on November 18, 1925 Martha married Francis N. McCullah (born July 7, 1906 in Missouri and died May 23, 1988 in Seattle, King County, Washington). Martha and Francis had a daughter Eugenia Hoyt McCullah who was born February 18, 1927 in Longview, Cowlitz County, Washington and died January 30, 2001. The 1930 U. S. Federal Census showed Martha as divorced living with daughter Eugenia in Longview, Cowlitz County, Washington and Francis as divorced living with his mother and stepfather in Longview, Cowlitz County, Washington. On September 28, 1931 Martha P. McCullah and Francis N. McCullah remarried in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, and in the U. S. Federal Census for 1940 were shown living together in Longview, Cowlitz County, Washington and their daughter Eugenia living with grandmother Eugenia Campbell, also in Longview. On November 17, 1961 in Cowlitz County, Washington Eugenia Hoyt McCullah married Henry Hollister Nash (born September 29, 1922 in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts and died January 15, 2000 in Multnomah, Oregon) . Re Eugenia Hoyt NcCullah in the U. S. Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 the notes show "Mar 1943: Name listed as EUGENIA HOYT MCCULLAH; Oct 1958: Name listed as EUGENIA HOY CAMPBELL; 03 Mar 1975: Name listed as EUGENIA HOYT NASH; 08 Feb 2001: Name listed as EUGENIA H NASH". At the time of her wedding in 1961 Washington marriage records show her name Eugenia Hoyt Campbell. In January 1949 a Northwest Airlines Inc. passenger list from Honolulu to Portland show her as Eugenia H. Campbell. Given the number of times and where Eugenia's name shows as Campbell and considering the events in her natural parents relationship, the question of adoption arises and research continues. Depending if and by whom Eugenia may have been adopted William's line may continue. There are no known issue of granddaughter Eugenia. 
Hoyt, Eugenia Garner (I8558)
 
23

Time line for Jane Campbell

1960 - Jane Campbell was born April 12, 1860 in Keeseville, New York. The date of birth shown on the death certificate is April 12, 1861.  The 1860 U. S. Federal Census shows Jane as one month old so 1860 would seem to be the correct year.  The 1900 Federal Census shows her birth as April 1860.  The best date of birth seems to be April 12, 1860.
 
 On the 1860 U. S. Federal Census Jane is shown with her mother, sisters Ann and Harriet, and brother Charles.  Father John and brother John both died in 1860 and 1859 respectively, before the census.
 
1865 - On the 1865 New York State Census Jane is not with her mother who is working for James Taggard.  Ann and Harriet are with their mother and brother Charles has died.  Jane is not yet accounted for.
 
1870 - On the U. S. Federal Census for 1870 Jane is listed as Junnie(Jennie) Manley living in Middlebury, VT with Albert F. and Laura Manley. She is aged 10 and shows born in Vermont which is erroneous.

1882 - Jane's mother's probate records show three heirs, her daughters, Mrs. Anna B. Badger, Manchester, NH; Miss Hattie E. Campbell, Manchester, NH; and Jane - now Miss Jennie C. Manley of Middlebury, Vermont. 

1900 - On the 1900 U. S. Federal Census Jane is shown as Jennie C. Willard living with Albert Manley and Albert M. Badger in Middlebury, Vermont.   Albert Manley, is shown as head of household and widowed. Jennie relationship to him as dau law ((daughter-in-law(no other children of Albert known) or daughter-by-law?)).  Jennie is shown as married in 1888.  Also this was her first marriage per the 1930 U. S. Federal Census.  Jennie's death certificate shows her spouse as Frank Willard age 93 and living.  No trace of Frank Willard has been found in the U. S. Federal Census records thru 1940.  Albert M. Badger's relationship to the head of household shows as boarder.  He certainly seems to be the son of Jennie's sister Ann(Anna) and was born in March 1895.  Jennie's sister Ann died in Nashua, New Hampshire May 19, 1896.  Sometime after the 1900 census was taken he must have been adopted by Jennie as Albert M. Badger's birth record shows him as Albert Willard born March 26, 1895 in Nashua, father as Frank E. Willard and mother as Jane Campbell.  Subsequent records his full name to be Albert Manley Willard.

1905 - Jennie appears in Vermont Probate Court records as Administratrix for the Estate of Martha M. Manley. In her petition for appointment she cites that Martha "on the 10th day of December 1896 at said Middlebury died intestate; that your petitioner is only child and daughter of said deceased; that said deceased left surviving no other heir or next of kin except your petitioner who is the only person known to your petitioner as interested in the estate of said deceased".

1910 - On the 1900 U. S. Federal Census Jennie and son Albert are shown as boarders in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Nothing has yet been found for Jennie and son Albert on the 1920 Federal Census. However an article in The Portsmouth Herald on May 26, 1923 On both the 1930 and 1940 Federal Censuses Jennie and Albert are living together in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

1947 - Jennie died June 23, 1947 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire and is buried in Harmony Grove Cemetery in Portsmouth. New Hampshire Death and Disinterment Records, 1754-1947 also shows her name as Jennie C. Willard (Jennie C. Manley); father as Campbell Manley; husband as Frank Willard alive aged 93; and informant as A. M. Willard, Portsmouth, NH. Does showing the father as Campbell Manley refer to Campbell who was the natural father and Manley as the adoptive? father?

The transition from Jane Campbell to Jennie C. Manley has not yet been fully resolved but considering the foregoing it appears that Jane was legally adopted. Jennie seemed to have all the necessary prerequisites to petition the court to be the administratrix of Martha Manley's estate and the declarations she made in so doing. She most likely was with the Manleys before 1865 as she was then no longer with her mother and sisters. In addition there seems to have been some connection between Jennie's mother and Albert Manley. Jennie seems to have continued to be a part of her natural family. In her natural mother's estate records in 1882 Jennie was listed as an heir as aforementioned. She also took in and apparently adopted her sister Ann(Anna) Badger's child Albert Manley Badger. Interesting the child was so named as it could infer a special family connect with Albert Manley.

Re the Manleys: Albert F. Manley was born in Hubbardton, Rutland County, Vermont on March 30, 1818; died in Middlebury, Addison County, Vermont on August 21, 1904 and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Pittsford, Rutland County, Vermont. He married Martha Beckley on February 2, 1845 in Weathersfield, Windsor County, Vermont. Martha was born March 16, 1825 in Weathersfield, Windsor County, Vermont; died December 10, 1896 in Middlebury, Addison County, Vermont and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Pittsford, Rutland County, Vermont. One further note - on the 1850 U. S. Federal Census Albert is listed as age 31 and Martha age 24. On the aforementioned 1870 census Albert is listed age 50 and "Laura" Manley listed age 45. Correct Albert's age to 52 then the age differential remains at 7 years. Martha and "Laura" seem to be the same person. No other relevant sightings of Laura Manley have been made.


The year following Jennie's death the Veterans of Foreign Wars of Portsmouth, New Hampshire dedicated a plaque in her memory.  In the dedicatory address it was stated "She was a graduate of Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vt., and the New York School of Art". (Middlebury College has no record re Jennie under any of her surnames.)  The 1940 Federal Census Jennie shows as having completed three years of college. 
 

 
No record re Frank Willard has been found and according to her death certificate he was still living in 1947 but her son Albert's obituary in 1954 states he was "the son of the late Frank and Jennie C. (Manley) Willard".  The VFW dedicatory address indicates she was a widow of a civil war veteran which is not in agreement with her death certificate which stated her husband to still be living. 
 
 
  
Campbell, Jane (I8585)
 
24

U. S. Federal Census for 1940 shows Mabel as a resident of the Oregon State Hospital of the Insane in Salem, Oregon and that she also was there as of April 1, 1935. She is also shown as married, as does John elsewhere in the census. 
Fosberry, Mabel E. (I8591)
 
25

U. S. Federal Census information
1910 - Living in Goose Lake, Lake County, Oregon with a boarder
1920 - Living with wife Mabel in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon
1930 - Living with wife Mabel in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon
1940 - Living in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon shown as married but wife not listed. Mabel shown elsewhere as resident in Oregon State Hospital for the Insane

U. S. World War I Draft Registration Card, 1917-1918, signed by John D. Campbell confirms date of birth and shows his residence as Susanville, Lassenville County, California, and nearest relative as Mrs. Mabel E. Campbell. His occupation was an edgerman at the Lassen Lumber & Box Company.

U. S. World War II Registration Card signed by J. D. Campbell confirms his date and place of his birth. Also would add credence that Mabel was elsewhere as another person was named as the one that would always know where signer was.

Regarding John's father -- No records of his birth have been found in New Hampshire records. It seems his birth was recorded in Oregon by John years later. On that record his father shows as "William James Campbell" and his mother as "Harriet Ellen Rowe". On all U. S Federal Censuses the recording of his mother's place of birth is consistent and correct as New York. However re his father's place of birth the census shows for -- 1880 as no father, 1910 as Texas, 1920 as Kentucky, 1930 as U. S. and 1940 it was not a question to be answered. 
Campbell, John Davenport (I8590)
 

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